Safety Culture Excellence®

Safety Culture Excellence® header image 1

Entries Tagged as 'Safety Measurement'

378 - Business and Safety: Are the Strategies Aligned?

March 9th, 2015 · Comments

Greetings everyone, this podcast recorded while in Decatur, TX. I’d like to share an article I wrote that was published in OH&S Magazine. The published article can either be found on the magazine’s website or under Insights at www.ProActSafety.com

I hope you enjoy the podcast this week. If you would like access to archived podcasts (older than 90 days – dating back to January 2008) please visit www.ProActSafety.com/Store. For more detailed strategies to achieve and sustain excellence in performance and culture, pick up a copy of our book, STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence - http://proactsafety.com/insights/steps-to-safety-culture-excellence

Have a great week!

Shawn M. Galloway
ProAct Safety
1sceapp.jpg
00:0000:00

Tags: Safety Management · Safety Measurement · Articles · Leading Safety · Safety Culture and Performance Excellence Strategy · Safety Culture Excellence

375 - Motivating Measurement

February 16th, 2015 · Comments

Greetings all, here is a short video for this week's podcast. I hope it gets you thinking!

Shawn M. Galloway
President, ProAct Safety
1sceapp.jpg
Watch Now:

Tags: Safety Measurement · Employee Involvement · Videos · Safety Culture and Performance Excellence Strategy · Leading Indicators for Safety

Quantity and Quality

January 21st, 2015 · Comments

Rule of thumb:  Any quantity goal without a quality requirement will encourage “pencil whipping”.  This is especially true of safety audits and observations.  Organizations that require everyone to do two observations per month or two audits per week are misstating what they truly want.  Quantity is ineffective without quality.  There are thousands of studies that support the idea that a certain quantity of contact or assessment is necessary for improvements.  But they all go out the window if the numbers are filled with fake, or otherwise poor-quality, components.

What drives change is the right number of quality contacts.  Going through the motions and getting the numbers just to check off a box is not what organizations really want.  So why do they set these goals, omitting the quality requirements?  Largely because the quantity is easily and discretely measured while the quality is more complicated and subjective.  It is easier to create accountability around numbers than quality, but doing so can completely compromise the effort.  State both quantity and quality requirements in all goals and do your best to hold workers accountable for both.

 

-Terry L. Mathis

For more insights, visit 

www.ProActSafety.com

Terry L. Mathis is the founder and CEO of ProAct Safety, an international safety and performance excellence firm. He is known for his dynamic presentations in the fields of behavioral and cultural safety, leadership, and operational performance, and is a regular speaker at ASSE, NSC, and numerous company and industry conferences. EHS Today listed Terry as a Safety Guru in ‘The 50 People Who Most Influenced EHS three consecutive times. He has been a frequent contributor to industry magazines for over 15 years and is the coauthor of STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence (2013, WILEY).


1sceapp.jpg

Tags: General · Behavior Based Safety · Safety Management · Safety Measurement · Safety Observations · Safety & Quality · Performance Management · Lean Behavior-Based Safety · Behavioral Quality · Behavior-Based Quality · Behaviour-Based Safety · Safety Culture Excellence · Blog Posts

Much Ado About Zero

January 14th, 2015 · Comments

The furor about “zero accidents” would have inspired Shakespeare to write a play.  It is, indeed, a tempest in a teapot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.  Of course, every organization should desire to be accident free and, of course, they should not set goals that develop a tolerance for a certain level of accidents.  On the other hand, goals of perfection can be demotivating when they are consistently not reached, and preaching “zero accidents” while practicing “hurry and get it done” will usually backfire.

The bottom line is, whatever you set as a goal, if you don’t have a systematic strategy for reaching success, and if your strategy is impractical, misunderstood, or not believed to be real, your goal is meaningless.  Zero accidents is not a direct product you can manufacture; it is the by-product of excellent strategy and excellent execution.  Setting goals for the process and monitoring the value derived from the efforts, rather than simply measuring lagging indicators, is a clearer and cleaner path to success.

-Terry L. Mathis

For more insights, visit www.ProActSafety.com

Terry L. Mathis is the founder and CEO of ProAct Safety, an international safety and performance excellence firm. He is known for his dynamic presentations in the fields of behavioral and cultural safety, leadership, and operational performance, and is a regular speaker at ASSE, NSC, and numerous company and industry conferences. EHS Today listed Terry as a Safety Guru in ‘The 50 People Who Most Influenced EHS in 2010, 2011 and 2012-2013. He has been a frequent contributor to industry magazines for over 15 years and is the coauthor of STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence, 2013, WILEY.

1sceapp.jpg

Tags: Safety Measurement · Safety Culture and Performance Excellence Strategy · Leading Indicators for Safety · Safety Excellence Strategy · Blog Posts

368 - Measure What You Want

December 29th, 2014 · Comments

Greetings all, here is a short video for this week's podcast. I hope it gets you thinking!

Shawn M. Galloway
President, ProAct Safety

1sceapp.jpg
Watch Now:

Tags: Safety Measurement · Videos · Safety Culture and Performance Excellence Strategy · Leading Indicators for Safety · Safety Excellence Strategy

367 - Common Practice: The Third Level of Leading Indicators

December 22nd, 2014 · Comments

Greetings everyone, this podcast recorded while in Akeley, MN. I’d like to share an article Terry Mathis wrote that was published in EHS Today Magazine. The published article can either be found on the magazine’s website or under Insights at www.ProActSafety.com

I hope you enjoy the podcast this week. If you would like to download or play on demand our other podcasts, please visit the ProAct Safety’s podcast website at: http://www.safetycultureexcellence.com. If you would like access to archived podcasts (older than 90 days – dating back to January 2008) please visit www.ProActSafety.com/Store. For more detailed strategies to achieve and sustain excellence in performance and culture, pick up a copy of our book, STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence - http://proactsafety.com/insights/steps-to-safety-culture-excellence

Have a great week!

Shawn M. Galloway
ProAct Safety
1sceapp.jpg
00:0000:00

Tags: Behavior Based Safety · Safety Measurement · Organizational Safety Culture · Articles · Safety Perception Surveys · Behavior-Based Safety Software · Behaviour-Based Safety · Safety Culture and Performance Excellence Strategy · Safety Culture Excellence · Leading Indicators for Safety · Safety Excellence Strategy

Do You Have a Scoreboard?

December 10th, 2014 · Comments

The only thing more amazing to me than the number of programs organizations adopt to improve safety, is the fact that the majority don’t have a metric to determine if the program worked or not.  

Using lagging indicators to measure the effectiveness of a new safety program is fraught with inaccuracies.  So many factors impact TRIR and severity rates that one new program might or might not have had an impact.  Add to that fact the concept of Hawthorne Effect (that any focus of effort might impact results short term) and you have a totally unreliable metric of program success.

First, all programs should fit into an overarching safety strategy.  Second, the program should have internal KPIs to determine if it is doing what it is designed to do.  Third, the organization should have intermediate indicators to determine if the program is changing perceptions and organizational behavior.  Lastly, there should be a division of lagging indicators into categories directly impacted by the program to see if they are responding to the combination of program impact, changes in perceptions and behavior, and if the costs of the program create an ROI worthy of the effort.

-Terry L. Mathis

For more insights, visit www.ProActSafety.com

Terry L. Mathis is the founder and CEO of ProAct Safety, an international safety and performance excellence firm. He is known for his dynamic presentations in the fields of behavioral and cultural safety, leadership, and operational performance, and is a regular speaker at ASSE, NSC, and numerous company and industry conferences. EHS Today listed Terry as a Safety Guru in ‘The 50 People Who Most Influenced EHS in 2010, 2011 and 2012-2013. He has been a frequent contributor to industry magazines for over 15 years and is the coauthor of STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence, 2013, WILEY.
1sceapp.jpg

Tags: Safety Measurement · Safety Culture and Performance Excellence Strategy · Leading Indicators for Safety · Safety Excellence Strategy · Blog Posts

Zero Injuries: What is Really Wrong?

November 19th, 2014 · Comments

The talk about “zero injuries” has ranged from the ridiculous to the sublime.  Yes, you should not have a tolerance for accidents, ergo set a goal of zero.  Yes, it is not acceptable to hurt ANYONE, ergo set a goal of zero.  However, a goal is not a strategy.  A goal is not a call to action nor a roadmap to success.  Bottom line, zero injuries is a reactive definition of excellence.  Zero is not what you should do nor is it what you should not do.  It is the desired outcome, not the game plan.  It is the coach telling the team at half time, “Don’t lose!”

True safety excellence is not a lofty goal or dream of perfection.  It is a strategic approach to a specific challenge.  The approach must be prescriptive and predictive.  It must involve specific approaches to foster greater knowledge, skills and involvement.  It must communicate and inspire discretionary effort from those involved.  It must include meaningful metrics that are leading indicators and give each worker a way to rate his or her own performance on a daily basis.  

Simply saying “Zero Injuries” is none of these.  It is just a good sounding slogan which is temporarily accomplished by luck or normal variation more often than it is permanently accomplished by solid strategy and execution.

-Terry L. Mathis

For more insights, visit www.ProActSafety.com

Terry L. Mathis is the founder and CEO of ProAct Safety, an international safety and performance excellence firm. He is known for his dynamic presentations in the fields of behavioral and cultural safety, leadership, and operational performance, and is a regular speaker at ASSE, NSC, and numerous company and industry conferences. EHS Today listed Terry as a Safety Guru in ‘The 50 People Who Most Influenced EHS in 2010, 2011 and 2012-2013. He has been a frequent contributor to industry magazines for over 15 years and is the coauthor of STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence, 2013, WILEY.

1sceapp.jpg

Tags: Safety Measurement · Safety Culture and Performance Excellence Strategy · Leading Indicators for Safety · Safety Excellence Strategy · Blog Posts

361 - Safety Culture: The Second Level of Leading Indicators

November 10th, 2014 · Comments

Greetings everyone, this podcast recorded while in New Orleans, LA. I’d like to share an article Terry Mathis wrote that was published in EHS Today Magazine. The published article can either be found on the magazine’s website or under Insights at www.ProActSafety.com

I hope you enjoy the podcast this week. If you would like to download or play on demand our other podcasts, please visit the ProAct Safety’s podcast website at www.SafetyCultureExcellence.com. If you would like access to archived podcasts (older than 90 days – dating back to January 2008) please visit www.ProActSafety.com/Store. For more detailed strategies to achieve and sustain excellence in performance and culture, pick up a copy of our book, STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence http://proactsafety.com/insights/steps-to-safety-culture-excellence

Have a great week!

Shawn M. Galloway
ProAct Safety
1sceapp.jpg
00:0000:00

Tags: Safety Measurement · Articles · Safety Culture and Performance Excellence Strategy · Safety Culture Excellence · Leading Indicators for Safety · Safety Excellence Strategy

Milestones: The Tendency to Think Backwards

October 22nd, 2014 · Comments

A client recently emailed me about a celebration his organization had held to recognize the workforce for reaching a “milestone in their progress towards safety excellence.”  I asked if the “milestone” was something identified on their road map to safety excellence.  After some hesitation he admitted that it was not on the road map but that they had recognized a significant achievement that they believed would be sustainable and wanted to celebrate it.

There is nothing inherently wrong with looking backwards and realizing you have accomplished something worthwhile, but there is a missed opportunity.  Mapping out a journey and identifying milestones in advance does not detract from the satisfaction of reaching them.  In fact, it reinforces the feelings because there was a clear plan to get there and accomplishing the goal is even more satisfying than accidentally realizing success.  Clarity of purpose and direction creates milestones in the road ahead and not just in the rear-view mirror.  

Visible progress toward goals is one of the cheapest and most effective motivators available.  Use it deliberately, communicate your progress continuously, celebrate successes earnestly and motivate your workforce toward safety excellence relentlessly.

-Terry L. Mathis

For more insights, visit www.ProActSafety.com

Terry L. Mathis is the founder and CEO of ProAct Safety, an international safety and performance excellence firm. He is known for his dynamic presentations in the fields of behavioral and cultural safety, leadership, and operational performance, and is a regular speaker at ASSE, NSC, and numerous company and industry conferences. EHS Today listed Terry as a Safety Guru in ‘The 50 People Who Most Influenced EHS in 2010, 2011 and 2012-2013. He has been a frequent contributor to industry magazines for over 15 years and is the coauthor of STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence, 2013, WILEY.
1sceapp.jpg

Tags: Safety Measurement · Safety Incentives and Rewards · Safety Culture and Performance Excellence Strategy · Safety Excellence Strategy · Blog Posts