Safety Culture Excellence®

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Entries Tagged as 'Safety Observations'

Peeling the Onion: Solving Safety Problems One Layer at a Time

April 29th, 2015 · Comments

During a safety observation, workers were observed using the wrong tool for a job, which created a risk.  When a safety committee saw the report, they petitioned management to buy the proper tool for the work station.  The committee member who received the tool took it to the work station and presented it to the worker on shift with an explanation of what had happened and the action taken.  The worker admitted that he really had not been taught what the proper tool was for the job and had used the home-made tool since he began his job.

The next month’s observations reported that workers were still using the wrong tool for the job.  Follow-up revealed that workers on the other shifts had not received the communication and were not aware of the new tool.  The safety committee made sure that every worker was made aware of the proper tool in safety and tool box meetings and felt sure the next month’s data would show the problem solved.

The next month, the observations showed the workers were STILL not using the right tool. Follow-up revealed that workers had formed the habit of using the wrong tool and that the habit was not changed.  The safety committee developed a plan to remind workers and, within the next few months, the problem was truly solved.

Lessons learned: 

•             Safety problems can be multi-layered and require multiple fixes.

•             Solving problems requires follow-up.

•             Influences need to be addressed in order to change the behavior.

 

-Terry L. Mathis

 

For more insights, visit 

www.ProActSafety.com

 

Terry L. Mathis is the founder and CEO of ProAct Safety, an international safety and performance excellence firm. He is known for his dynamic presentations in the fields of behavioral and cultural safety, leadership, and operational performance, and is a regular speaker at ASSE, NSC, and numerous company and industry conferences. EHS Today listed Terry as a Safety Guru in ‘The 50 People Who Most Influenced EHS three consecutive times. He has been a frequent contributor to industry magazines for over 15 years and is the coauthor of STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence (2013, WILEY).

Tags: General · Safety Observations · Change Management · Behavior Science · Blog Posts

384 - Seeing the Right Moves: The Key to Reducing Risks

April 20th, 2015 · Comments

Greetings everyone, this podcast recorded while in Savannah, GA. I’d like to share an article I wrote that was published in BIC Magazine. The published article can either be found on the magazine’s website or under Insights at www.ProActSafety.com

I hope you enjoy the podcast this week. If you would like access to archived podcasts (older than 90 days – dating back to January 2008) please visit www.ProActSafety.com/Store. For more detailed strategies to achieve and sustain excellence in performance and culture, pick up a copy of our book, STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence - http://proactsafety.com/insights/steps-to-safety-culture-excellence

Have a great week!

Shawn M. Galloway
ProAct Safety
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Tags: Safety Observations · Employee Involvement · Organizational Safety Culture · Performance Management · Articles · Leading Safety · Safety Culture Assessment · Safety Culture and Performance Excellence Strategy · Safety Culture Excellence · Psychology Safety · Safety Excellence Strategy · Safety Culture Excellence Workshop · Safety Leadership

Quantity and Quality

January 21st, 2015 · Comments

Rule of thumb:  Any quantity goal without a quality requirement will encourage “pencil whipping”.  This is especially true of safety audits and observations.  Organizations that require everyone to do two observations per month or two audits per week are misstating what they truly want.  Quantity is ineffective without quality.  There are thousands of studies that support the idea that a certain quantity of contact or assessment is necessary for improvements.  But they all go out the window if the numbers are filled with fake, or otherwise poor-quality, components.

 

What drives change is the right number of quality contacts.  Going through the motions and getting the numbers just to check off a box is not what organizations really want.  So why do they set these goals, omitting the quality requirements?  Largely because the quantity is easily and discretely measured while the quality is more complicated and subjective.  It is easier to create accountability around numbers than quality, but doing so can completely compromise the effort.  State both quantity and quality requirements in all goals and do your best to hold workers accountable for both.

 

 

-Terry L. Mathis

For more insights, visit 

 

www.ProActSafety.com

Terry L. Mathis is the founder and CEO of ProAct Safety, an international safety and performance excellence firm. He is known for his dynamic presentations in the fields of behavioral and cultural safety, leadership, and operational performance, and is a regular speaker at ASSE, NSC, and numerous company and industry conferences. EHS Today listed Terry as a Safety Guru in ‘The 50 People Who Most Influenced EHS three consecutive times. He has been a frequent contributor to industry magazines for over 15 years and is the coauthor of STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence (2013, WILEY).

 

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Tags: General · Behavior Based Safety · Safety Management · Safety Measurement · Safety Observations · Safety & Quality · Performance Management · Lean Behavior-Based Safety · Behavior-Based Quality · Behaviour-Based Safety · Safety Culture Excellence · Blog Posts

371 - Misunderstanding Hazards and Risks

January 19th, 2015 · Comments

Greetings all, here is a short video for this week's podcast. I hope it gets you thinking!

Shawn M. Galloway
President, ProAct Safety

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Watch Now:

Tags: Safety Observations · Safety Communication · Videos · Leading Safety · Accident Causation

Checking Off the Box

December 17th, 2014 · Comments

When can good safety practices go bad?  When they become routine and quit adding value to the daily safety of workers.  In short, when they are completed just to check off the box that says they are completed.  This seldom happens intentionally.  

Most safety programs and activities have very specific goals to increase safety awareness or engagement, provide pre-job planning, or just to keep safety on everyone’s’ mind.  But when programs stress the quantity without the quality and do not focus on capturing or delivering value, they can become meaningless activities.

Safety moments in meetings, JSAs, audits, observations, refresher training, safety toolbox meetings, all of these can add value or become valueless activities based on how they are carried out.  As soon as any safety activity is speedily “checked off” just to get it done, the opportunity to continue doing it this way appears.  It is incumbent on everyone to question the value of safety efforts and not let them become meaningless.  

This means leaders must listen to workers regularly and keep in touch with the reality of shop-floor safety.  If doing it poorly ever becomes acceptable, the die is cast.  In this, as in most safety efforts, prevention is preferable to reaction.

-Terry L. Mathis

For more insights, visit www.ProActSafety.com

Terry L. Mathis is the founder and CEO of ProAct Safety, an international safety and performance excellence firm. He is known for his dynamic presentations in the fields of behavioral and cultural safety, leadership, and operational performance, and is a regular speaker at ASSE, NSC, and numerous company and industry conferences. EHS Today listed Terry as a Safety Guru in ‘The 50 People Who Most Influenced EHS in 2010, 2011 and 2012-2013. He has been a frequent contributor to industry magazines for over 15 years and is the coauthor of STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence, 2013, WILEY.

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Tags: Safety Management · Safety Observations · Safety Excellence Strategy · safety compliance · Safety Leadership · Blog Posts

STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence Workshop - October 2014

August 12th, 2014 · Comments

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Strategy is a framework of choices the organization makes to determine how to capture and deliver value. Strategy, therefore, is how do we win? How confident are you about your strategy to achieve and sustain safety excellence?

Based on the book, STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence, the authors will lead this workshop and provide a detailed roadmap on how to develop a three to five year safety excellence business plan. This two-day workshop is limited to ten participants. It would be helpful if each attendee read the book prior to the event to escalate the discovery process.

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STEPS is a universal process for identifying, prioritizing, and solving safety problems at the organizational, behavioral, conditional, or cultural levels. Using one process for addressing all safety issues eliminates the need for continuously bringing in new consultants, programs, and approaches that create the "flavor of the month" mentality.
ProAct Safety® recently compiled data on over 1,100 sites that requested our help in improving safety. The commonalities of these sites' issues has led to a new approach to solving safety problems and permanently implementing continuous improvement. The approach includes organizational structure, problem identification, issue prioritization, action plan development, improvement metrics, and a motivational and marketing strategy to ensure sustainability. The process is called STEPS (Strategic Targets for Excellent Performance in SafetySM).

Objectives:

  1. Develop a solid understanding of a safety excellence strategy
  2. Learn the leading causes of safety program ineffectiveness and failure
  3. Examine a standard methodology used by excellent safety organizations to identify virtually any type of safety issue or problem
  4. Learn to use statistical tools to prioritize issues by their potential impact
  5. Learn to develop action plans to solve safety problems
  6. Explore innovative ways to measure success and progress
  7. Discover how one process can replace multiple programs and allow for seamless transition of focus without causing a flavor-of-the-month culture

Workshop Takeaways - Attendees will be provided with:

  • Electronic Materials (Templates) to return to their organization and facilitate discussions for the creation of their unique safety excellence strategy.
  • A 60-Minute Recorded High-Level Webinar outlining the key STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence methodologies. This will help convey the messages and build support and understanding for the necessary path forward. Moreover, this can also help during on-boarding of future leaders to provide an understanding of why the strategy was created, furthering the future support necessary as the organization continuously improves safety performance and culture and acquires or promotes new leadership talent.
  • Access to Shawn M. Galloway or Terry L. Mathis from 8 am to 5 pm CT during the week by email and phone for one month following the workshop, to help support efforts by coaching and advising through the initial creation of the strategy. If not immediately available, calls and emails will be returned within 24 hours.
  • A personalized autographed copy of the book, STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence.

For more information, visit this link.

See you there!

Shawn M. Galloway
ProAct Safety, Inc.

Tags: Safety Management · Safety Measurement · Safety Observations · Organizational Safety Culture · Safety Culture Excellence Conference · Safety Culture/BBS Workshops · Leading Safety · Safety Culture Assessment · Safety Culture and Performance Excellence Strategy · Safety Culture Excellence · Leading Indicators for Safety · Safety Excellence Strategy · Safety Culture Excellence Workshop

347 - The Confrontation Calamity

July 28th, 2014 · Comments

Greetings everyone, this podcast recorded while in Toronto, ON. I’d like to share an article Terry Mathis wrote that was published June 2014 edition of EHS Today Magazine. The published article can either be found on the magazine’s website or under Insights at www.ProActSafety.com.

I hope you enjoy the podcast this week. If you would like to download or play on demand our other podcasts, please visit the ProAct Safety’s podcast website at: http://www.safetycultureexcellence.com. If you would like access to archived podcasts (older than 90 days – dating back to January 2008) please visit www.ProActSafety.com/Store. For more detailed strategies to achieve and sustain excellence in performance and culture, pick up a copy of our book, STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence - http://proactsafety.com/insights/steps-to-safety-culture-excellence

Have a great week!

Shawn M. Galloway
ProAct Safety

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Tags: Safety Observations · Employee Involvement · Organizational Safety Culture · Performance Management · Change Management · Articles · Supervisor Safety Coaching · Psychology Safety · Leadership Safety Coaching

341 - Who Should Perform Behavior-Based Safety Observations?

June 16th, 2014 · Comments

Greetings everyone, this podcast recorded while in Galveston, TX. I’d like to share an article I wrote that was published May 2014 in BIC Magazine. The published article can either be found on the magazine’s website or under Insights at www.ProActSafety.com.

I hope you enjoy the podcast this week. If you would like to download or play on demand our other podcasts, please visit the ProAct Safety’s podcast website at: http://www.safetycultureexcellence.com. If you would like access to archived podcasts (older than 90 days – dating back to January 2008) please visit www.ProActSafety.com/Store. For more detailed strategies to achieve and sustain excellence in performance and culture, pick up a copy of our book, STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence - http://proactsafety.com/insights/steps-to-safety-culture-excellence

Have a great week!

Shawn M. Galloway
ProAct Safety

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Tags: Behavior Based Safety · Safety Observations · Organizational Safety Culture · Change Management · Articles · Lean Behavior-Based Safety · Behavioral Quality · Behavior-Based Quality · Unions and Behavior-Based Safety · Behavior-Based Safety Software · Behaviour-Based Safety · Safety Culture and Performance Excellence Strategy · Safety Culture Excellence · Psychology Safety · Behavior Science · Leading Indicators for Safety

The Confrontation Calamity

April 16th, 2014 · Comments

The emphasis on the concept of confrontation in safety is epidemic.  Consultants, books and articles taut the virtue of teaching workers to confront each other over safety issues.  They claim that the willingness and ability to confront may be the key competency of safety.  They argue that it must become unacceptable to see a risk being taken and not confront the individual taking the risk.

The basis of this misguided concept goes back to two core misconceptions of safety thinking, (i.e. the idea that the goal of safety is to fail less and that all risk-taking is a matter of worker choice).  When one worker sees another being bad there must be a confrontation to make the worker less bad.  The worker taking a risk simply made a bad choice and confrontation will result in less-bad decisions in the future.  The truth is that safety excellence is about achieving success, not simply avoiding failure and that there are organizational influences that impact workers’ decisions that need to be discovered and addressed if lasting change is to be made.

The alternative to the concept of confrontation is the concept of coaching.  Coaching is a way to achieve success rather than simply avoid failure.  It involves workers building on each other’s strengths rather than simply trying to correct their weaknesses.  It is built upon a vision of success in which everyone helps each other reach a goal. It necessitates a vision of success and helps to identify organizational influences on workers’ behavioral choices.

Confrontation weakens relationships and culture and seldom results in lasting change.  Coaching builds relationships and culture and almost always results in improved performance.  Workers listen to their allies differently than they listen to their critics.  Confrontation creates either enmity within the safety culture or avoidance behavior that has the appearance of confrontation without the reality.  Either damages the very fabric of what it is supposed to improve.

-Terry L. Mathis

Terry L. Mathis is the founder and CEO of ProAct Safety, an international safety and performance excellence firm. He is known for his dynamic presentations in the fields of behavioral and cultural safety, leadership, and operational performance, and is a regular speaker at ASSE, NSC, and numerous company and industry conferences. EHS Today listed Terry as a Safety Guru in ‘The 50 People Who Most Influenced EHS in 2010, 2011 and 2012-2013. He has been a frequent contributor to industry magazines for over 15 years and is the coauthor of STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence, 2013, WILEY.

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Tags: Behavior Based Safety · Safety Observations · Employee Involvement · Safety Communication · Organizational Safety Culture · Performance Management · Change Management · Articles · Lean Behavior-Based Safety · Unions and Behavior-Based Safety · Behaviour-Based Safety · Safety Culture and Performance Excellence Strategy · Safety Culture Excellence · Psychology Safety · Leadership Safety Coaching · Safety Leadership · Blog Posts

335 – Who Should Implement Behavior Based Safety?

March 31st, 2014 · Comments

Greetings everyone, this podcast recorded while in Anchorage, Alaska. I’d like to share an article I wrote that was published March 2014 in BIC Magazine. The published article can either be found on the magazine’s website or under Insights at www.ProActSafety.com.

I hope you enjoy the podcast this week. If you would like to download or play on demand our other podcasts, please visit the ProAct Safety’s podcast website at: http://www.safetycultureexcellence.com. If you would like access to archived podcasts (older than 90 days – dating back to January 2008) please visit www.ProActSafety.com/Store. For more detailed strategies to achieve and sustain excellence in performance and culture, pick up a copy of our book, STEPS to Safety Culture Excellence - http://proactsafety.com/insights/steps-to-safety-culture-excellence

Have a great week!

Shawn M. Galloway
ProAct Safety

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Tags: Behavior Based Safety · Safety Observations · Organizational Safety Culture · Articles · Lean Behavior-Based Safety · Safety Culture/BBS Workshops · Safety Culture Assessment · Behavior-Based Quality · Unions and Behavior-Based Safety · Behavior-Based Safety Software · Behaviour-Based Safety · Safety Culture and Performance Excellence Strategy · Behavior Science